Federal Government Entities

All Entities

Version 05/14/24
Count: 408

ACTION

Federal Register

ACTION was established by Reorganization Plan No. 1 of 1971, effective July 1, 1971. ACTION's purpose was to mobilize Americans for voluntary service throughout the United States and in developing countries overseas through programs which help meet basic human needs and support the self-help efforts of low-income individuals and communities. ACTION's functions relating to SCORE and ACT programs were transferred to the Small Business Administration. Other functions exercised by the Director of ACTION prior to March 31, 1995 were transferred to the Corporation for National and Community Service by 107 Stat. 888 and Proclamation 6662 of April 4, 1994.

ACTION

Administration Office, Executive Office of the President

Federal Register

The Office of Administration (OA) was created by Reorganization Plan No. 1 of 1977 and Executive Order 12028. As a component of the Executive Office of the President, the Office's primary function is to provide common administrative and support services for the various agencies and offices of the EOP.

Administration Office, Executive Office of the President

Administrative Conference of the United States

Federal Register

The Administrative Conference of the United States (ACUS) was established under the Administrative Conference Act (5 U. S. C. 591-96), as a permanent independent agency of the Federal Government. ACUS provides suitable arrangements through which Federal agencies, assisted by outside experts, may cooperatively study mutual problems, exchange information, and develop recommendations for action by proper authorities to the end that private rights may be fully protected and regulatory activities and other Federal responsibilities may be carried out expeditiously in the public interest. Other purposes of the ACUS include the promotion of effective public participation and efficiency in the rulemaking process; The reduction of unnecessary litigation in the regulatory process; the improvement of the use of science in the regulatory process; and the improvement of the effectiveness of laws applicable to the regulatory process.

Administrative Conference of the United States

Administrative Office of United States Courts

Federal Register

Created in 1939, the Administrative Office of the United States Courts (AO) serves the federal Judiciary in carrying out its constitutional mission to provide equal justice under law. The AO is the central support entity for the Judicial Branch. It provides a wide range of administrative, legal, financial, management, program, and information technology services to the federal courts. The AO provides support and staff counsel to the Judicial Conference of the United States and its committees, and implements and executes Judicial Conference policies, as well as applicable federal statutes and regulations. The AO facilitates communications within the Judiciary and with Congress, the Executive Branch, and the public on behalf of the Judiciary.

Administrative Office of United States Courts

Advisory Council on Historic Preservation

Federal Register

The Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) is an independent federal agency that promotes the preservation, enhancement, and productive use of our nation's historic resources, and advises the President and Congress on national historic preservation policy. The goal of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), which established the ACHP in 1966, is to have federal agencies act as responsible stewards of our nation's resources when their actions affect historic properties. The ACHP is the only entity with the legal responsibility to encourage federal agencies to factor historic preservation into federal project requirements.

Advisory Council on Historic Preservation

Advocacy and Outreach Office

Federal Register

USDA’s Office of Advocacy and Outreach was established by the 2008 Farm Bill to improve access to USDA programs and to improve the viability and profitability of small farms and ranches, beginning farmers and ranchers, and socially disadvantaged farmers or ranchers. As such, OAO is split into five key program areas: Socially disadvantaged farmers, small and beginning farmers and ranchers, Higher education institutions program, farm worker coordination, and community engagement.

Advocacy and Outreach Office

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

Federal Register

The Agency for Healthcare Policy and Research was renamed the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality (AHRQ) under the Healthcare Research and Quality Act of 1999 which amended Title IX of the Public Health Service Act (42 U. S. C. 299 et seq). AHRQ is the health services research arm of the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). AHRQ is a home to research centers that specialize in major areas of health care research such as: quality improvement and patient safety, outcomes and effectiveness of care, clinical practice and technology assessment, and health care organization and delivery systems. AHRQ is also a major source of funding and technical assistance for health services research and research training at leading U. S. universities and other institutions. In addition AHRQ acts as a science partner, working with the public and private sectors to build the knowledge base for what works—and does not work—in health and health care and to translate this knowledge into everyday practice and policymaking. For more information on the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and its activities, please visit the agency homepage at https://www.ahrq.gov.

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

Agency for International Development

Federal Register

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) is an independent Federal agency established by 22 U. S. C. 6563 that receives overall foreign policy guidance from the Secretary of State. Its principal statutory authority is the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended (22 U. S. C. 2151 et seq. ). USAID serves as the focal point within the Government for economic matters affecting U. S. relations with developing countries. USAID administers international economic and humanitarian assistance programs. The Administrator is under the direct authority and foreign policy guidance of the Secretary of State. For more information on the U. S. Agency for International Development’s organization and activities, please visit the agency homepage at https://www.usaid.gov/.

Agency for International Development

Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

Federal Register

In 1980, Congress created the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) to implement the health-related sections of laws that protect the public from hazardous wastes and environmental spills of hazardous substances. The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), commonly known as the "Superfund" Act, provided the Congressional mandate to remove or clean up abandoned and inactive hazardous waste sites and to provide federal assistance in toxic emergencies. As the lead Agency within the Public Health Service for implementing the health-related provisions of CERCLA, ATSDR is charged under the Superfund Act to assess the presence and nature of health hazards at specific Superfund sites, to help prevent or reduce further exposure and the illnesses that result from such exposures, and to expand the knowledge base about health effects from exposure to hazardous substances.

Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

Aging Administration

Federal Register

The Administration on Aging (AoA) was created under the Older Americans Act of 1965. The AoA is the Federal agency responsible for advancing the concerns and interests of older people and their caregivers. AoA works with and through the Aging Services Network to promote the development of a comprehensive and coordinated system of home and community-based long-term care that is responsive to the needs and preferences of older people and their family caregivers. AoA is part of the Department of Health and Human Services and is headed by the Assistant Secretary for Aging, who reports directly to the Secretary.

Aging Administration

Agricultural Marketing Service

Federal Register

The Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) was established by the Secretary of Agriculture on April 2, 1972, under the authority of Reorganization Plan No. 2 of 1953 (5 U. S. C. app. ) and other authorities. The Service administers standardization, grading, certification, market news, marketing orders, research and promotion, and regulatory programs. The Agricultural Marketing Service includes five commodity programs--Dairy, Fruit and Vegetable, Livestock and Seed, Poultry, and Cotton and Tobacco. The programs provide standardization, grading and market news services for those commodities. They enforce such Federal Laws as the Perishable Agricultural Commodities Act and the Federal Seed Act. AMS commodity programs also oversee marketing agreements and orders, administer research and promotion programs, and purchase commodities for Federal food programs. The AMS National Organic Program (NOP) develops, implements, and administers national production, handling, and labeling standards for organic agricultural products. The NOP also accredits the certifying agents (foreign and domestic) who inspect organic production and handling operations to certify that they meet USDA standards. The AMS Science and Technology Program lends centralized scientific support to AMS programs, including laboratory analyses, laboratory quality assurance, coordination of scientific research conducted by other agencies for AMS, and statistical and mathematical consulting services. The AMS Transportation and Marketing Program brings together a unique combination of traffic managers, engineers, rural policy analysts, international trade specialists, and agricultural marketing specialists to help solve problems of U. S. and world agricultural transportation. , provides better quality products to the consumer at reasonable cost, improves market access for growers with small-to medium sized farms, and promotes regional economic development. AMS is part of the Marketing and Regulatory Programs (MRP) mission area. MRP agencies facilitate the domestic and international marketing of U. S. agricultural products and ensure the health and care of animals and plants. MRP agencies are active participants in setting national and international standards.

Agricultural Marketing Service

Agricultural Research Service

Federal Register

The Agricultural Research Service (ARS) was established on November 2, 1953 under the Secretary of Agriculture’s Reorganization Plan No. 2 of 1953. ARS is the principal in-house research agency of the U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). ARS conducts research to develop and transfer solutions to agricultural problems of high national priority. It provides information access and dissemination to ensure high-quality safe food and other agricultural products; assess the nutritional needs of Americans; sustain a competitive agricultural economy; enhance the natural resource base and the environment; and provide economic opportunities for rural citizens, communities, and society as a whole. Research activities are carried out at 103 domestic locations (including Puerto Rico and the U. S. Virgin Islands) and 5 overseas locations. Much of this research is conducted in cooperation with partners in State universities and experiment stations, other Federal agencies, and private organizations. National Programs, headquartered in Beltsville, MD, is the focal point in the overall planning and coordination of ARS' research programs. Day-to-day management of the respective programs for specific field locations is assigned to eight area offices. ARS also includes the National Agricultural Library (NAL), which is the primary resource in the United States for information about food, agriculture, and natural resources, and serves as an electronic gateway to a widening array of scientific literature, printed text, and agricultural images. NAL serves USDA and a broad customer base including policymakers, agricultural specialists, research scientists, and the general public. NAL works with other agricultural libraries and institutions to advance open and democratic access to information about agriculture and the Nation's agricultural knowledge.

Agricultural Research Service

Agriculture Department

Federal Register

The Department of Agriculture works to improve and maintain farm income and to develop and expand markets abroad for agricultural products. The Department helps to curb and cure poverty, hunger, and malnutrition. It works to enhance the environment and to maintain production capacity by helping landowners protect the soil, water, forests, and other natural resources. The Department, through inspection and grading services, safeguards and ensures standards of quality in the daily food supply. The Department of Agriculture (USDA) was created by act of May 15, 1862 (7 U. S. C. 2201).

Agriculture Department

Air Force Department

Federal Register

The Department of the Air Force is responsible for defending the United States through control and exploitation of air and space. The Department of the Air Force (USAF) was established as part of the National Military Establishment by the National Security Act of 1947 (61 Stat. 502) and came into being on September 18, 1947. The National Security Act Amendments of 1949 redesignated the National Military Establishment as the Department of Defense, established it as an executive department, and made the Department of the Air Force a military department within the Department of Defense (63 Stat. 578). The Department of the Air Force is separately organized under the Secretary of the Air Force. It operates under the authority, direction, and control of the Secretary of Defense (10 U. S. C. 8010). The Department consists of the Office of the Secretary of the Air Force, the Air Staff, and field organizations.

Air Force Department

Air Quality National Commission

Federal Register

The National Commission on Air Quality was a 13 member Commission created by the 1977 Clean Air Act Amendments. The Commission was required to report to Congress on the effectiveness of that law and on alternative approaches to controlling air pollution, in time for the next Congressional revision of clean air legislation. NCAQ was terminated upon submission of its final report on March 3, 1981.

Air Quality National Commission

Air Transportation Stabilization Board

Federal Register

On September 22, 2001, President Bush signed into law the Air Transportation Safety and System Stabilization Act ("Act") (Public Law 107-42). The Act establishes the Air Transportation Stabilization Board ("Board"). The Board may issue up to $10 billion in Federal credit instruments, e.g. (loan guarantees).

Air Transportation Stabilization Board

Alaska Power Administration

Federal Register

The Alaska Power Administration was established by the Secretary of the Interior in 1967. The Administration was abolished and its responsibilities transferred to the Department of Energy by act of August 4, 1977 (91 Stat. 578).

Alaska Power Administration

Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau

Federal Register

The Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, statutorily named the Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) was established under the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (the Act) on January 24, 2003. Rendering the functions of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF) into two new organizations with separate functions, the Act created a new tax and trade bureau within the Department of the Treasury, and shifted certain law enforcement functions of ATF to the Department of Justice. The Act called for the tax collection functions to remain with the Department of the Treasury; and the new organization was called the “Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau. ” The mission of TTB is to collect alcohol, tobacco, firearms, and ammunition excise taxes that are rightfully due; to protect the consumer of alcohol beverages through compliance programs that are based upon education and enforcement of the industry to ensure an effectively regulated marketplace; and to assist industry members to understand and comply with Federal tax, product, and marketing requirements associated with the commodities we regulate.

Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau

Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives Bureau

Federal Register

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) is responsible for enforcing Federal criminal laws and regulating the firearms and explosives industries. ATF, formerly known as the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms, was initially established by Department of Treasury Order No. 221, effective July 1, 1972, which transferred the functions, powers, and duties arising under laws relating to alcohol, tobacco, firearms, and explosives from the Internal Revenue Service to ATF. The Homeland Security Act of 2002 (6 U. S. C. 531) transferred certain functions and authorities of ATF to the Department of Justice and established it under its current name. ATF works, directly and through partnerships, to investigate and reduce violent crime involving firearms and explosives, acts of arson, and illegal trafficking of alcohol and tobacco products. The Bureau provides training and support to its Federal, State, local, and international law enforcement partners and works primarily in 23 field divisions across the 50 States, Puerto Rico, the U. S. Virgin Islands, and Guam. It also has foreign offices in Mexico, Canada, Colombia, and France.

Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives Bureau

American Battle Monuments Commission

Federal Register

The American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC) was established by Congress in 1923 to commemorate the service, achievements, and sacrifice of U. S. armed forces where they have served overseas since 1917, and within the U. S. when directed by public law. The ABMC commemorative mission is reflected in 24 overseas military cemeteries that serve as resting places for almost 125,000 American war dead; on Tablets of the Missing that memorialize more than 94,000 U. S. servicemen and women; and through 25 memorials, monuments and markers.

American Battle Monuments Commission

Amtrak Reform Council

Federal Register

The Amtrak Reform Council was an independent bipartisan Federal commission established under the Amtrak Reform and Accountability Act of 1997 (P. L. 105-134). The Council consisted of eleven members whose statutory mandate was to make recommendations to Amtrak in order to help it reach operational self-sufficiency, and to report annually to Congress on Amtrak's performance. On February 7, 2002, the Council released to Congress its Action Plan for the Restructuring and Rationalization of the National Intercity Rail Passenger System. The Council, in a vote of nine Council members in favor, one against, and one abstaining (Secretary of Transportation), adopted the Action Plan.

Amtrak Reform Council

Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service

Federal Register

The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service was reestablished by the Secretary of Agriculture on March 14, 1977, pursuant to authority contained in 5 U. S. C. 301 and Reorganization Plan No. 2 of 1953 (5 U. S. C. app. ). The Service was established to conduct regulatory and control programs to protect and improve animal and plant health for the benefit of man and the environment. In cooperation with State governments, the agency administers Federal laws and regulations pertaining to animal and plant health and quarantine, humane treatment of animals, and the control and eradication of pests and diseases. Regulations to prevent the introduction or interstate spread of certain animal or plant pests or diseases are also enforced by the Service. It also carries out research and operational activities to reduce crop and livestock depredation caused by birds, rodents, and predators.

Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service

Antitrust Division

Federal Register

The Assistant Attorney General in charge of the Antitrust Division is responsible for promoting and maintaining competitive markets by enforcing the Federal antitrust laws. This involves investigating possible antitrust violations, conducting grand jury proceedings, reviewing proposed mergers and acquisitions, preparing and trying antitrust cases, prosecuting appeals, and negotiating and enforcing final judgments. The Division prosecutes serious and willful violations of antitrust laws by filing criminal suits that can lead to large fines and jail sentences. Where criminal prosecution is not appropriate, the Division seeks a court order forbidding future violations of the law and requiring steps by the defendant to remedy the anticompetitive effects of past violations. The Division also is responsible for acting as an advocate of competition within the Federal Government as well as internationally. This involves formal appearances in Federal administrative agency proceedings, development of legislative initiatives to promote deregulation and eliminate unjustifiable exemptions from the antitrust laws, and participation on executive branch policy task forces and in multilateral international organizations. The Division provides formal advice to other agencies on the competitive implications of proposed transactions requiring Federal approval, such as mergers of financial institutions.

Antitrust Division

Antitrust Modernization Commission

Federal Register

The Antitrust Modernization Commission was created pursuant to the Antitrust Modernization Commission Act of 2002 (P. L. 107-273). The Commission was charged by statute to examine whether the need exists to modernize the antitrust laws and to identify and study related issues; to solicit views of all parties concerned with the operation of the antitrust laws; to evaluate the advisability of proposals and current arrangements with respect to any issues so identified; and to prepare and submit to Congress and the President a report. The Antitrust Modernization Commission submitted its Report and Recommendations to Congress and the President on April 2, 2007. The Antitrust Modernization Commission terminated on May 31, 2007, pursuant to the Antitrust Modernization Commission Act, as amended

Antitrust Modernization Commission

Appalachian States Low-Level Radioactive Waste Commission

Federal Register

In 1986, Maryland ratified the Appalachian States Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact (Chapter 33, Acts of 1986). Delaware, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia also have ratified the Compact. The Compact established the Appalachian States Low-Level Radioactive Waste Commission to assure interstate cooperation for the proper management and disposal of low-level radioactive wastes. The Commission identifies a host state (based on the volume and curie content of radioactive waste generated) to receive and dispose of radioactive waste from party states. Pennsylvania is currently the host state. Costs and benefits are distributed equitably among party states. Wastes generated outside the region may be banned by the Commission. To reduce the volume of low-level radioactive waste, the Commission conducts research and recommends regulations. The Commission also prepares contingency plans in the event the regional facility is closed and enters into temporary agreements for emergency disposal.

Appalachian States Low-Level Radioactive Waste Commission

Architect of the Capitol

Federal Register

The Architect of the Capitol is responsible for the care and maintenance of the U. S. Capitol and the buildings and grounds of the Capitol complex. The agency implements construction, renovation, conservation, and landscape improvement projects as authorized by the Congress. The Architect of the Capitol is charged with operating and maintaining the buildings of the Capitol complex committed to his care by Congress. Permanent authority for the care and maintenance of the Capitol was established by the act of August 15, 1876 (40 U. S. C. 162, 163). The Architect's duties include the mechanical and structural maintenance of the Capitol, the conservation and care of works of art in the building under the Architect's jurisdiction, the upkeep and improvement of the Capitol grounds, and the arrangement of inaugural and other ceremonies held in the building or on the grounds. In addition to the Capitol, the Architect is responsible for the upkeep of all of the congressional office buildings, the Library of Congress buildings, the U. S. Supreme Court building, the Thurgood Marshall Federal Judiciary Building, the Capitol Power Plant, the Capitol Police headquarters, and the Robert A. Taft Memorial. The Architect performs his duties in connection with the Senate side of the Capitol and the Senate office buildings subject to the approval of the Senate Committee on Rules and Administration. In matters of general policy in connection with the House office buildings, his activities are subject to the approval and direction of the House Office Building Commission. The Architect is under the direction of the Speaker in matters concerning the House side of the Capitol. He is subject to the oversight of the Committee on House Administration with respect to many administrative matters affecting operations on the House side of the Capitol complex. In addition, the Architect of the Capitol serves as the Acting Director of the U. S. Botanic Garden under the Joint Committee on the Library.

Architect of the Capitol

Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board

Federal Register

The Access Board is an independent Federal agency devoted to accessibility for people with disabilities. Created in 1973 to ensure access to federally funded facilities, the Board is now a leading source of information on accessible design. The Board develops and maintains design criteria for the built environment, transit vehicles, telecommunications equipment, and for electronic and information technology. It also provides technical assistance and training on these requirements and on accessible design and continues to enforce accessibility standards that cover federally funded facilities. The Board is structured to function as a coordinating body among Federal agencies and to directly represent the public, particularly people with disabilities. Half of its members are representatives from most of the Federal departments. The other half is comprised of members of the public appointed by the President, a majority of whom must have a disability.

Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board

Arctic Research Commission

Federal Register

The United States Arctic Research Commission was established by the Arctic Research and Policy Act of 1984 (as amended, Public Law 101-609). The Commission's principal duties are (1) to establish the national policy, priorities, and goals necessary to construct a federal program plan for basic and applied scientific research with respect to the Arctic, including natural resources and materials, physical, biological and health sciences, and social and behavioral sciences; (2) to promote Arctic research, to recommend Arctic research policy, and to communicate our research and policy recommendations to the President and the Congress; (3) to work with the National Science Foundation as the lead agency responsible for implementing the Arctic research policy and to support cooperation and collaboration throughout the Federal Government; (4) to give guidance to the Interagency Arctic Research Policy Committee (IARPC) to develop national Arctic research projects and a five-year plan to implement those projects; and (5) to interact with Arctic residents, international Arctic research programs and organizations and local institutions including regional governments in order to obtain the broadest possible view of Arctic research needs.

Arctic Research Commission

Armed Forces Retirement Home

Federal Register

The Armed Forces Retirement Home is the nation's oldest retirement community for enlisted military veterans. Established by Congress in 1851, a permanent trust fund was established and was fed by monthly, by active duty payroll deductions of 25 cents, when the average pay of a soldier was $7 a month. Fines and forfeitures from the armed forces and the monthly withholding have provided the principal support for the Home throughout its history. In 1991, Congress incorporated the U. S. Naval Home in Gulfport, MS, and U. S. Soldiers' and Airmen's Home into an independent establishment in the Executive Branch of the Federal government known as the Armed Forces Retirement Home (AFRH). Each facility was maintained as a separate entity of the Retirement Home for administrative purposes. In 2001, Congress renamed the U. S. Naval Home and the U. S. Soldiers' and Airmen's Home the Armed Forces Retirement Home - Gulfport and the Armed Forces Retirement Home - Washington, respectively.

Armed Forces Retirement Home

Arms Control and Disarmament Agency

Federal Register

The mission of the United States Arms Control and Disarmament Agency is to strengthen the national security of the United States by formulating, advocating, negotiating, implementing and verifying effective arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament policies, strategies, and agreements. In so doing, ACDA ensures that arms control is fully integrated into the development and conduct of United States national security policy.

Arms Control and Disarmament Agency

Army Department

Federal Register

The mission of the Department of the Army is to organize, train, and equip active duty and reserve forces for the preservation of peace, security, and the defense of our Nation. As part of our national military team, the Army focuses on land operations; its soldiers must be trained with modern arms and equipment and be ready to respond quickly. The Army also administers programs aimed at protecting the environment, improving waterway navigation, flood and beach erosion control, and water resource development. It provides military assistance to Federal, State, and local government agencies, including natural disaster relief assistance. The American Continental Army, now called the United States Army, was established by the Continental Congress on June 14, 1775, more than a year before the Declaration of Independence. The Department of War was established as an executive department at the seat of government by act approved August 7, 1789 (1 Stat. 49). The Secretary of War was established as its head. The National Security Act of 1947 (50 U. S. C. 401) created the National Military Establishment, and the Department of War was designated the Department of the Army. The title of its Secretary became Secretary of the Army (5 U. S. C. 171). The National Security Act Amendments of 1949 (63 Stat. 578) provided that the Department of the Army be a military department within the Department of Defense.

Army Department

Barry M.goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Foundation

Federal Register

The Barry M.goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Program was established by the United States Congress in 1986 in honor of former United States Senator and 1964 Presidential candidate Barry Goldwater (R-Arizona). Its goal is to provide a continuing source of highly qualified scientists, mathematicians, and engineers by awarding scholarships to college students who intend to pursue careers in these fields.

Barry M.goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Foundation

Benefits Review Board

Federal Register

The Department of Labor's Benefits Review Board was created in 1972, by Congress, to review and issue decisions on appeals of worker's compensation claims arising under the Longshore and Harbor Worker's Compensation Act and the Black Lung Benefits amendments to the Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act of 1969.

Benefits Review Board

Board of Directors of the Hope for Homeowners Program

Federal Register

Hope for Homeowners Program along with the Board of Directors of the Hope for Homeowners Program were established under Title II, sec. 257 of the National Housing Act, as amended by the HOPE for Homeowners Act of 2008, located in Title IV of division A of the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008 (HERA),(Pub. L. 110-289, 122 Stat. 2654, approved July 30, 2008). Under the National Housing Act, the Board's duties are to establish requirements and standards for the HOPE for Homeowners Program. This program is a temporary program established within the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) of the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) that offers homeowners and existing loan holders (or servicers acting on their behalf) FHA insurance on refinanced loans for distressed borrowers to support long-term sustainable homeownership by, among other things, allowing homeowners to avoid foreclosure. The HOPE for Homeowners Program is administered by HUD through FHA. The Board is composed of the Secretary of HUD, the Secretary of Treasury, the Chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, and the Chairperson of the Board of Directors of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, or their respective designees.

Board of Directors of the Hope for Homeowners Program

Bonneville Power Administration

Federal Register

The Bonneville Power Administration's mission as a public service organization is to create and deliver the best value for our customers and constituents as we act in concert with others to assure the Pacific Northwest: (1) An adequate, efficient, economical and reliable power supply; (2) A transmission system that is adequate to the task of integrating and transmitting power from federal and non-federal generating units, providing service to BPA's customers, providing interregional interconnections, and maintaining electrical reliability and stability; and (3) Mitigation of the Federal Columbia River Power System's impacts on fish and wildlife. BPA is committed to cost-based rates, and public and regional preference in its marketing of power. BPA will set its rates as low as possible consistent with sound business principles and the full recovery of all of its costs, including timely repayment of the federal investment in the system.

Bonneville Power Administration

Broadcasting Board of Governors

Federal Register

The Broadcasting Board of Governors' mission is to promote freedom and democracy and to enhance understanding by broadcasting accurate, objective, and balanced news and information about the United States and the world to audiences abroad. The Broadcasting Board of Governors (BBG) became an independent agency on October 1, 1999, by authority of the Foreign Affairs Reform and Restructuring Act of 1998 (22 U. S. C. 6501 note). It is composed of nine members. Eight members are appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate; the ninth, an ex-officio member, is the Secretary of State. The BBG serves as the governing body for all nonmilitary U. S. broadcasting and provides programming in 56 languages via radio, television, and the Internet. The BBG broadcast services include the Voice of America, the Office of Cuba Broadcasting, Radio Free Europe/ Radio Liberty, Radio Free Asia, and the Middle East Broadcasting Networks. All BBG broadcast services adhere to the broadcasting standards and principles of the International Broadcasting Act of 1994, which include reliable, accurate, and comprehensive news; balanced and comprehensive presentations of U. S. thought, institutions, and policies, as well as discussions about those policies; information about developments throughout the world; and a variety of opinions from nations around the world.

Broadcasting Board of Governors

Census Bureau

Federal Register

The U. S. Census Bureau was established as a permanent office by act of March 6, 1902 (32 Stat. 51). The major functions of the Census Bureau are authorized by the Constitution, which provides that a census of population shall be taken every 10 years, and by laws codified as title 13 of the United States Code. The law also provides that the information collected by the Census Bureau from individual persons, households, or establishments be kept strictly confidential and be used only for statistical purposes. The Census Bureau is responsible for the the decennial censuses of population and housing; the quinquennial censuses of State and local governments, manufacturers, mineral industries, distributive trades, construction industries, and transportation; current surveys that provide information on many of the subjects covered in the censuses at monthly, quarterly, annual, or other intervals; the compilation of current statistics on U. S. foreign trade, including data on imports, exports, and shipping; special censuses at the request and expense of State and local government units; publication of estimates and projections of the population; publication of current data on population and housing characteristics; and current reports on manufacturing, retail and wholesale trade, services, construction, imports and exports, State and local government finances and employment, and other subjects.

Census Bureau

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Federal Register

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), as part of the Public Health Service, is charged with protecting the public health of the Nation by providing leadership and direction in the prevention of and control of diseases and other preventable conditions and responding to public health emergencies. Within the CDC, there are four coordinating centers, two coordinating offices, and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

Federal Register

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, originally designated the Health Care Finance Administration (HCFA), was established as a subagency under the Department of Health and Human Services by the Reorganization Order of march 9, 1977. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) was created to administer oversight of the Medicare Program and the federal portion of the Medicaid Program. It also ensures that program beneficiaries are aware of the services for which they are eligible and that those services are accessible and of high quality and develops health and safety standards for providers of health care services authorized by Medicare and Medicaid legislation. CMS is also responsible for administering the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP), the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), and several other health-related programs.

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

Central Intelligence Agency

Federal Register

The Central Intelligence Agency was established by the National Security Act of 1947, as amended (50 U. S. C. 401 et seq. ). It now functions under that statute, Executive Order 12333 of December 4, 1981, the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 (50 U. S. C. 401 note), and other laws, Executive orders, regulations, and directives. The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) collects intelligence from human sources and other appropriate means, but, it does not carry out internal security functions nor exercise police, subpoena, or law enforcement powers. The Agency also correlates, evaluates, and disseminates intelligence related to national security; provides overall direction for and coordination of intelligence collecting outside the United States by U. S. Intelligence Community elements authorized to engage in human source collection. In coordination with other departments, agencies, or authorized elements of the United States Government, the CIA ensures that resources are used effectively and that adequate consideration is given to the risks to those involved in such collection and to the United States; it also carries out other intelligence-related functions and duties necessary for safeguarding national security as the President or the Director of National Intelligence (DNI) may direct; and it coordinates, under the direction of the DNI and consistent with section 207 of the Foreign Service Act of 1980, relationships between elements of the U. S. Intelligence Community and the intelligence or security services of foreign governments or international organizations in matters of national security or intelligence that is acquired clandestinely.

Central Intelligence Agency

Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board

Federal Register

The CSB is an independent federal agency charged with investigating industrial chemical accidents. The agency's board members are appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate. The CSB conducts root cause investigations of chemical accidents at fixed industrial facilities. Root causes are usually deficiencies in safety management systems, but can be any factor that would have prevented the accident if that factor had not occurred. Other accident causes often involve equipment failures, human errors, unforeseen chemical reactions or other hazards. The agency does not issue fines or citations, but does make recommendations to plants, regulatory agencies such as the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), industry organizations, and labor groups. Congress designed the CSB to be non-regulatory and independent of other agencies so that its investigations might, where appropriate, review the effectiveness of regulations and regulatory enforcement. [https://www.csb.gov]

Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board

Child Support Enforcement Office

Federal Register

The Office of Child Support Enforcement was established pursuant to act of January 4, 1975 (42 U. S. C. 651). Its mission is to provide leadership in the planning, development, management, and coordination of the Department's Child Support Enforcement programs and activities authorized and directed by title IV-D of the Social Security Act, as amended (42 U. S. C. 651), and other pertinent legislation. The general purpose of this legislation and the Child Support Enforcement programs is to require States to enforce support obligations owed by absent parents to their children by locating absent parents, establishing paternity when necessary, and obtaining child support.

Child Support Enforcement Office

Children and Families Administration

Federal Register

The Administration for Children and Families was created April 15, 1991, under authority of section 6 of the Reorganization Plan No. 1 of 1953. The Administration provides advice to the Secretary of Health and Human Services on issues pertaining to children, youth, and families; child support enforcement; community services; developmental disabilities; family assistance; Native American assistance; refugee resettlement; and legalized aliens.

Children and Families Administration

Christopher Columbus Quincentenary Jubilee Commission

Federal Register

The Christopher Columbus Quincentenary Jubilee Commission was established by the act of August 7, 1984 (98 Stat. 1257) and was formed on September 12, 1985. The Commission consisted of 30 members whose mission was to plan, encourage, coordinate and conduct the commemoration of the voyages of Christopher Columbus and to set forth general provisions and policies governing the process of recognition and support of the Quincentenary projects. In accordance with the terms of the act that established it, the Commission was terminated on December 31, 1993 after submitting a comprehensive report to Congress that incorporated the Commission's recommendations for the commemoration.

Christopher Columbus Quincentenary Jubilee Commission

Civil Rights Commission

Federal Register

The U. S. Commission on Civil Rights (USCCR) was created under the Civil Rights Act of 1957, as amended, and reestablished by the United States Commission on Civil Rights Act of 1994, as amended (42 U. S. C. 1975). The Commission on Civil Rights collects and studies information on discrimination or denials of equal protection of the laws because of race, color, religion, sex, age, disability, national origin, or in the administration of justice in such areas as voting rights, enforcement of Federal civil rights laws, and equal opportunity in education, employment, and housing.

Civil Rights Commission

Coast Guard

Federal Register

The United States Coast Guard was established by act of January 28, 1915 (14 U. S. C. 1) and became a component of the Department of Transportation on April 1, 1967, pursuant to the Department of Transportation Act of October 15, 1966. Following the enactment of the Homeland Security Act of 2002, The Coast Guard was transferred from Department of Transportation to the Department of Homeland Security on March 1, 2003 (116 Stat. 2135). The Coast Guard protects the public, the environment, and U. S. economic interests in the Nation's ports and waterways, along the coast, on international waters, or in any maritime region, as required, to support national security. Among its duties are: search and rescue operations in and over the high seas and navigable waters, maritime law enforcement, marine inspection and licensing, pilotage of the Great Lakes, protection of the marine environment by enforcing the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, ensuring the safety and security of ports and anchorages, maintaining the management of waterways, providing navigational aids, and regulating the construction, maintenance and operation of bridges and causeways across navigable waters.

Coast Guard

Commerce Department

Federal Register

The Department of Commerce encourages, serves, and promotes the Nation's international trade, economic growth, and technological advancement. The Department provides a wide variety of programs through the competitive free enterprise system. It offers assistance and information to increase America's competitiveness in the world economy; administers programs to prevent unfair foreign trade competition; provides social and economic statistics and analyses for business and government planners; provides research and support for the increased use of scientific, engineering, and technological development; works to improve our understanding and benefits of the Earth's physical environment and oceanic resources; grants patents and registers trademarks; develops policies and conducts research on telecommunications; provides assistance to promote domestic economic development; and assists in the growth of minority businesses.

Commerce Department

Commercial Space Transportation Office

Federal Register

The Commercial Space Transportation Office regulates and encourages the U. S. commercial space transportation industry. It licenses the private sector launching of space payloads on expendable launch vehicles and commercial space launch facilities. It also sets insurance requirements for the protection of persons and property and ensures that space transportation activities comply with U. S. domestic and foreign policy. Registration The agency provides a system for registering aircraft and recording documents affecting title or interest in the aircraft, aircraft engines, propellers, appliances, and spare parts.

Commercial Space Transportation Office

Commission of Fine Arts

Federal Register

The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency was created February 25, 1863, (12 Stat. 665), as an independent bureau of the Department of the Treasury. Its mission is to ensure that national banks, federal savings associations, and federal branches and agencies of foreign banking organizations operating in the United States (banks) operate in a safe and sound manner, provide fair access to financial services, treat customers fairly, and comply with applicable laws and regulations. The Office is headed by the Comptroller, who is appointed for a 5-year term by the President with the advice and consent of the Senate. The Office has the power to supervise and examine banks; approve or deny applications for new bank charters, branches, or mergers; take enforcement action against banks that do not comply with laws and regulations; and issue regulations and interpretations pertaining to banks. The Office supervises approximately 1,200 banks. The Office is independently funded through assessments on the assets of banks.

Commission of Fine Arts

Commission on Immigration Reform

Federal Register

The Commission on Immigration Reform was established by the Immigration Act of 1990 (Pub. L. 101-649) as an independent advisory commission. The Commission was created to review and evaluate the implementation and impact of U. S. immigration policy. Specifically, it focused on how the provisions of the implementing Act impacted family reunification, employment-based immigration, and diversifying the source of immigration, among other things. The Commission was terminated December 31, 1997.

Commission on Immigration Reform

Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled

Federal Register

The Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled (CITA) was established as an independent Federal agency by the Javits-Wagner-O'Day (JWOD) amendments of 1971. The function of the Committee was to provide employment opportunities for people who were blind or severely disabled. In 2006 JWOD was re-named AbilityOne. The AbilityOne Program uses the purchasing power of the federal government to buy products and services from participating, community-based nonprofit agencies nationwide dedicated to training and employing individuals with disabilities. Currently, AbilityOne employs more than 40,000 Americans who are blind or have other severe disabilities, making it the single largest source of jobs for such individuals in the United States.

Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled

Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements

Federal Register

The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (CITA), an interagency group chaired by the Department of Commerce, is responsible for matters affecting textile trade policy and for supervising the implementation of all textile trade agreements. CITA negotiates and administers provisions of Free Trade Agreements; implements the short supply, wool provisions, and other aspects of the Trade Preference Acts; and takes textile and apparel safeguard actions, when appropriate, under the World Trade Organization (WTO). CITA administers textile and apparel quotas on non-WTO countries and safeguard limits. CITA coordinates the administration's efforts to combat illegal textile and apparel transshipment. CITA was established by the President in Executive Order 11651 on March 3, 1972 and is comprised of the Departments of Commerce, State, Labor, and Treasury and the Office of the U. S. Trade Representative's Office. CITA is chaired by the Commerce Department's Deputy Assistant Secretary for Textiles and Apparel. The Commerce Department's Office of Textiles and Apparel (OTEXA) provides the staff support for the Committee, monitors all agreements and provides economic analysis and statistical data upon which the Committee relies in taking action.

Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements

Commodity Credit Corporation

Federal Register

The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) is a Government-owned and operated entity that was created to stabilize, support, and protect farm income and prices. CCC also helps maintain balanced and adequate supplies of agricultural commodities and aids in their orderly distribution. The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) was originally incorporated October 17, 1933, under a Delaware charter with a capitalization of $3 million. It was initially managed and operated in close affiliation with the Reconstruction Finance Corporation, which funded its operations. On July 1, 1939, CCC was transferred to the U. S. Department of Agriculture and later reincorporated under the Commodity Credit Corporation Charter Act (62 Stat. 1070; 15 U. S. C. 714) on July 1, 1948 as a Federal corporation within the USDA. The CCC stabilizes, supports, and protects farm income and prices, assists in maintaining balanced and adequate supplies of agricultural commodities and their products, and facilitates the orderly distribution of commodities. CCC also carries out assigned foreign assistance activities, such as guaranteeing the credit sale of U. S. agricultural commodities abroad. Major emphasis is also being directed toward meeting the needs of developing nations. Agricultural commodities are supplied and exported to combat hunger and malnutrition and to encourage economic development in developing countries. In addition, under the Food for Progress Program, CCC supplies commodities to provide assistance to developing democracies.

Commodity Credit Corporation

Commodity Futures Trading Commission

Federal Register

The Commodity Futures Trading Commission, the Federal regulatory agency for futures trading, was established by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission Act of 1974 (7 U. S. C. 4a). The Commission began operation in April 1975, and its authority to regulate futures trading was renewed by Congress in 1978, 1982, 1986, 1992, 1995, and 2000. The mission of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission is to protect market users and the public from fraud, manipulation, and abusive practices related to the sale of commodity futures and options, and to foster open, competitive, and financially sound commodity futures and option markets. The Commission consists of five Commissioners who are appointed by the President, with the advice and consent of the Senate. One Commissioner is designated by the President to serve as Chairman. The Commissioners serve staggered 5-year terms, and by law no more than three Commissioners can belong to the same political party. The Commission has six major operating components: the Divisions of Market Oversight, Clearing and Intermediary Oversight, and Enforcement and the Offices of the Executive Director, General Counsel, and Chief Economist.

Commodity Futures Trading Commission

Community Development Financial Institutions Fund

Federal Register

The CDFI Fund was created for the purpose of promoting economic revitalization and community development through investment in and assistance to community development financial institutions (CDFIs). The CDFI Fund was established by the Riegle Community Development and Regulatory Improvement Act of 1994.

Community Development Financial Institutions Fund

Competitiveness Policy Council

Federal Register

The Competitiveness Policy Council was established in 1991as an independent public advisory council by the Omnibus Trade and Competitiveness Act of 1988 (Pub. L. 100-418). The Council was created to develop recommendations for national strategies and on specific policies intended to enhance the productivity and international competitiveness of U. S. industries. During its existence, the Council made a number of important recommendations during its years of operation regarding pensions, education, public investment, trade negotiations, and many other issues. The Council was terminated in July 1996 after the House of Representatives Appropriations Committee withheld further funding of its operations on the grounds that the Council was "duplicative of private sector organizations" that performed the same function without receiveing Federal funding.

Competitiveness Policy Council

Comptroller of the Currency

Federal Register

The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency was created February 25, 1863, (12 Stat. 665), as an independent bureau of the Department of the Treasury. Its mission is to ensure that national banks, federal savings associations, and federal branches and agencies of foreign banking organizations operating in the United States (banks) operate in a safe and sound manner, provide fair access to financial services, treat customers fairly, and comply with applicable laws and regulations. The Office is headed by the Comptroller, who is appointed for a 5-year term by the President with the advice and consent of the Senate. The Office has the power to supervise and examine banks; approve or deny applications for new bank charters, branches, or mergers; take enforcement action against banks that do not comply with laws and regulations; and issue regulations and interpretations pertaining to banks. The Office supervises approximately 1,200 banks. The Office is independently funded through assessments on the assets of banks.

Comptroller of the Currency

Congressional Budget Office

Federal Register

The Congressional Budget Office provides the Congress with economic analyses of alternative fiscal, budgetary, and programmatic policy issues, and with information and estimates required for the congressional budget process. The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) was established by the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U. S. C. 601), which also created a procedure by which the United States Congress considers and acts upon the annual Federal budget. This process enables the Congress to have an overview of the Federal budget and to make overall decisions regarding spending and taxing levels and the deficit or surplus these levels incur.

Congressional Budget Office

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

Federal Register

The Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection (CFPB) is an independent bureau within the Federal Reserve System that empowers consumers with the information they need to make financial decisions in the best interests of them and their families. The CFPB was created under the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (Dodd-Frank Act). The purpose of the CFPB is to promote fairness and transparency for mortgages, credit cards, and other consumer financial products and services. The CFPB will set and enforce clear, consistent rules that allow banks and other consumer financial services providers to compete on a level playing field and that let consumers see clearly the costs and features of products and services. The functions of the CFPB to assist people in borrowing money or using other financial services include: implementing and enforcing Federal consumer financial laws; reviewing business practices to ensure that financial services providers are following the law; monitoring the marketplace and taking appropriate action to make sure markets work as transparently as they can for consumers; and establishing a toll-free consumer hotline and website for complaints and questions about consumer financial products and services.

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

Consumer Product Safety Commission

Federal Register

The Consumer Product Safety Commission was established as an independent regulatory agency by the Consumer Product Safety Act (15 U. S. C. 2051 et seq. ) in 1973 and reauthorized by the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008. The Commission consists of up to five members, who are appointed by the President with the advice and consent of the Senate, for 7-year terms. The Commission implements provisions of the Flammable Fabrics Act (15 U. S. C. 1191); Poison Prevention Packaging Act of 1970 (15 U. S. C. 1471); Federal Hazardous Substances Act (15 U. S. C. 1261); act of August 2, 1956 (15 U. S. C. 1211), prohibiting the transportation of refrigerators without door safety devices; Children's Gasoline Burn Prevention Act (15 U. S. C. 2056 note); and Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act (15 U. S. C. 8001 et seq. ).

Consumer Product Safety Commission

Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service

Federal Register

The Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service (CSREES) links the research and education resources and activities of USDA and works with academic and land-grant institutions throughout the Nation. In cooperation with its partners and customers, CSREES advances a global system of research, extension, and higher education in the food and agricultural sciences and related environmental and human sciences to benefit people, communities, and the Nation. CSREES's programs increase and provide access to scientific knowledge; strengthen the capabilities of land-grant and other institutions in research, extension, and higher education; increase access to and use of improved communication and network systems; and promote informed decisionmaking by producers, consumers, families, and community leaders to improve social conditions in the United States and around the world. These conditions include improved agricultural and other economic enterprises; safer, cleaner water, food, and air; enhanced stewardship and management of natural resources; healthier, more responsible and more productive individuals, families, and communities; and a stable, secure, diverse, and affordable national food supply. CSREES provides research, extension, and education leadership through programs in plant and animal systems; natural resources and environment; economic and community systems; families, 4-H, and nutrition; competitive research and integrated research, education, and extension programs and awards management; science and education resources development; and information systems and technology management. In 2009, CSREES was reorganized into the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) under the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008.

Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service

Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

Federal Register

The Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention was established as an independent organization under the authority of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (Pub. L. 93-415) as amended. Access information about the Council, an independent organization in the executive branch that coordinates all federal juvenile delinquency prevention programs, all federal programs and activities that detain or care for unaccompanied juveniles, and all federal programs relating to missing and exploited children.

Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

Copyright Office, Library of Congress

Federal Register

The United States Copyright Office, a part of the Library of Congress. It is the official U. S.government body that maintains records of copyright registration in the United States. It is used by copyright title searchers who are attempting to clear a chain of title for copyrighted works.

Copyright Office, Library of Congress

Copyright Royalty Board

Federal Register

The Copyright Royalty and Distribution Reform Act of 2004 (CRDRA) established the Copyright Royalty Judges program in the Library of Congress. The Copyright Royalty Judges (Judges) oversee the copyright law’s statutory licenses, which permit qualified parties to use multiple copyrighted works without obtaining separate licenses from each copyright owner. The Judges determine and adjust royalty rates and terms applicable to the statutory copyright licenses. They also oversee distribution of royalties deposited with the Copyright Office by certain statutory licensees and adjudicate controversies relating to the distributions.

Copyright Royalty Board

Copyright Royalty Judges

Federal Register

The Copyright Royalty Judges, who make up the Library of Congress’ Copyright Royalty Board, were established under the Copyright Royalty and Distribution Act of 2004 (Pub. L. 108-418). The Copyright Royalty Judges were created to replace copyright arbitration royalty panels and to make determinations and adjustments of reasonable terms and rates of certain royalty payments under certain sections of Title 17 of the United States Code. Other duties assigned to the Judges included making determinations concerning the adjustment of the copyright royalty rates; authorizing certain royalty fees collected to the extent that the Copyright Royalty Judges find that the distribution of such fees is not subject to controversy; accepting or rejecting certain royalty claims filed on the basis of timeliness or the failure to establish the basis for a claim; accepting or rejecting rate adjustment petitions and petitions to participate; determining the status of a digital audio recording device or a digital audio interface device; adopting as a basis for statutory terms and rates or as a basis for the distribution of statutory royalty payments, an agreement concerning such matters reached among some or all of the participants in a proceeding at any time during the proceeding; and performing other duties, as assigned by the Register of Copyrights within the Library of Congress.

Copyright Royalty Judges

Corporation for National and Community Service

Federal Register

The Corporation for National and Community Service engages Americans of all ages and backgrounds in community-based service that addresses the Nation's educational, public safety, environmental, and other human needs to achieve direct and demonstrable results. In so doing, the Corporation fosters civic responsibility, strengthens the ties that bind us together as a people, and provides educational opportunity for those who make a substantial commitment to service. The Corporation was established on October 1, 1993, by the National and Community Service Trust Act of 1993 (42 U. S. C. 12651 et seq. ). In addition to creating several new service programs, the Act consolidated the functions and activities of the former Commission on National and Community Service and the Federal agency ACTION.

Corporation for National and Community Service

Council of the Inspectors General on Integrity and Efficiency

Federal Register

The Council of the Inspectors General on Integrity and Efficiency (CIGIE) was established as an independent entity within the Executive branch under the Inspector General Reform Act of 2008. Prior to its establishment of the CIGIE, the Federal Inspectors General operated under the auspices of the President's Council on Integrity and Efficiency (PCIE) and the Executive Council on Integrity and Efficiency (ECIE) The mission of the CIGIE is to address integrity, economy and effectiveness issues that transcend individual Government agencies; and to increase the professionalism and effectiveness of personnel by developing policies, standards, and approaches to aid in the establishment of a well-trained and highly skilled workforce in the offices of the Inspectors General.

Council of the Inspectors General on Integrity and Efficiency

Council on Environmental Quality

Federal Register

The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) was established within the Executive Office of the President by the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (42 U. S. C. 4321 et seq. ). The Environmental Quality Improvement Act of 1970 (42 U. S. C. 4371 et seq. ) established the Office of Environmental Quality (OEQ) to provide professional and administrative support for the Council. The Council and OEQ are collectively referred to as the Council on Environmental Quality, and the CEQ Chair, who is appointed by the President, serves as the Director of OEQ. The Council develops policies which bring into productive harmony the Nation's social, economic, and environmental priorities, with the goal of improving the quality of Federal decisionmaking. As required by NEPA, CEQ evaluates, coordinates, and mediates Federal activities; advises and assists the President on both national and international environmental policy matters; and prepares the President's annual environmental quality report to Congress. In addition, it oversees Federal agency and department implementation of NEPA.

Council on Environmental Quality

Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency for the District of Columbia

Federal Register

The Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency for the District of Columbia (CSOSA) is a Federal, Executive branch agency, created by Congress in 1997 to perform the offender supervision function for D. C. Code offenders. It does so in coordination with the Superior Court of the District of Columbia and the U. S. Parole Commission. CSOSA's mission is to increase public safety, prevent crime, reduce recidivism, and support the fair administration of justice in close collaboration with the community. With a budget of $140 million and nearly 1,000 employees, CSOSA provides community supervision to 15,000 individuals on probation, parole or supervised release each day. [https://www.csosa.gov/about. aspx]

Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency for the District of Columbia

Defense Acquisition Regulations System

Federal Register

The Defense Acquisition Regulations System (DARS) develops and maintains acquisition rules and guidance to facilitate the acquisition workforce as they acquire the goods and services DoD requires to ensure America's warfighters continued worldwide success.

Defense Acquisition Regulations System

Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission

Federal Register

The Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission was a presidential advisory commission under the Office of the Secretary, Department of Defense. The Commission was established March 26, 1991 under the authority of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1991 (Pub. L. 101-510). The Commission was created to readdress charges brought against the process of a prior Defense Secretary’s Commission on Base Realignment and Closure established in 1988. The 1991 Commission reviewed recommendations made by the Secretary of Defense regarding base closures and realignments in 1991, 1993 and 1995. The Commission was terminated December 31, 1995.

Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission

Defense Contract Audit Agency

Federal Register

The Defense Contract Audit Agency (DCAA) is a subagency of the Department of Defense under the authority, direction, and control of the Under Secretary of Defense Comptroller. It was established January 8, 1965. While serving the public interest as its primary customer, The DCAA performs all necessary contract audits for the Department of Defense and provides accounting and financial advisory services regarding contracts and subcontracts to all DoD Components responsible for procurement and contract administration. These services are provided in connection with negotiation, administration, and settlement of contracts and subcontracts to ensure taxpayer dollars are spent on fair and reasonable contract prices. The DCAA also provides contract audit services to other Federal agencies as appropriate.

Defense Contract Audit Agency

Defense Criminal Investigative Service

Federal Register

The Defense Criminal Investigative Service (DCIS) was established in 1981 as the criminal investigative arm of the Office of Inspector General, Department of Defense. The Office of the Inspector General along with the DCIS was established under the DOD Authorization Act in 1983 (Pub. L. 97-252). The DCIS protects America’s Warfighters by investigating terrorism; preventing the illegal transfer of sensitive defense technologies to proscribed nations and criminal elements; investigating companies that use defective parts in weapons systems and equipment utilized by the military; stopping cyber crimes and computer intrusions; and investigating cases of fraud, bribery, and corruption to ensure taxpayer dollars are better spent defending our Nation.

Defense Criminal Investigative Service

Defense Department

Federal Register

The Department of Defense is responsible for providing the military forces needed to deter war and protect the security of our country. The major elements of these forces are the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, and Air Force, consisting of about 1. 3 million men and women on active duty. They are backed, in case of emergency, by the 825,000 members of the Reserve and National Guard. In addition, there are about 600,000 civilian employees in the Defense Department. Under the President, who is also Commander in Chief, the Secretary of Defense exercises authority, direction, and control over the Department, which includes the separately organized military departments of Army, Navy, and Air Force, the Joint Chiefs of Staff providing military advice, the combatant commands, and defense agencies and field activities established for specific purposes. The National Security Act Amendments of 1949 redesignated the National Military Establishment as the Department of Defense and established it as an executive department (10 U. S. C. 111), headed by the Secretary of Defense.

Defense Department

Defense Information Systems Agency

Federal Register

The Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) was originally established as the Defense Communication Agency (DCA) within the Department of Defense by direction of the Secretary of Defense on May 12, 1960. The DCA was renamed Defense Information Systems Agency by DoD Directive 5105. 19 of June 25, 1991. DISA is a combat support agency comprised of military, federal civilian, and contractor partners. DISA engineers and provides command and control capabilities and enterprise infrastructure to continuously operate and assure a global net-centric enterprise in direct support to joint warfighters, National level leaders, and other mission and coalition partners across the full spectrum of operations. (Source: https://www.disa. mil/)

Defense Information Systems Agency

Defense Intelligence Agency

Federal Register

The Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) was established on October 1, 1961 by DoD Directive 5105. 21 of August 1, 1961. The Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) is a Department of Defense combat support agency and an important member of the United States Intelligence Community. It is comprised of more than 16,500 military and civilian employees worldwide, DIA is a major producer and manager of foreign military intelligence. We provide military intelligence to warfighters, defense policymakers and force planners, in the Department of Defense and the Intelligence Community, in support of U. S. military planning and operations and weapon systems acquisition.

Defense Intelligence Agency

Defense Investigative Service

Federal Register

The Defense Investigative Service (DIS) was established by the Secretary of Defense, effective January 1, 1972, to consolidate certain investigative activities within the Department of Defense. The DIS's functions were to provide DoD components, and other U. S.government agencies when authorized, with a single centrally directed personnel security investigative service. In 1999 The Defense Investigative Service changed its name to Defense Security Service.

Defense Investigative Service

Defense Logistics Agency

Federal Register

In 1977, The Defense Supply Agency was renamed the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) and was placed under the authority, direction, and control of the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics. DLA supports both the logistics requirements of the military services and their acquisition of weapons and other materiel. The Agency provides logistics support and technical services to all branches of the military and to a number of Federal agencies. Agency supply centers consolidate the requirements of the military services and procure the supplies in sufficient quantities to meet their projected needs. The Agency manages supplies in eight commodity areas: fuel, food, clothing, construction material, electronic supplies, general supplies, industrial supplies, and medical supplies.

Defense Logistics Agency

Defense Mapping Agency

Federal Register

The Defense Mapping Agency (DMA) was established from the Mapping Charting and Geodesy Division, Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA), by DoD Directive 5105. 40 of January 1 1972, pursuant to a Presidential directive (press release), November 5, 1971, under authority of the National Security Act of 1947 (61 Stat. 495), July 26, 1947, as amended, initiating the consolidation of mapping functions previously dispersed among the military services. Consolidation effected, and DMA became operational, effective July 1, 1972, pursuant to General Order 3, DMA, on June 16, 1972, which formally transferred specified DOD components to DMA. DMA was terminated and its functions were transferred to the National Imagery and Mapping Agency by Pub. L. 104-201 (Sept. 23, 1996) In 2003, NIMA was redesignated as the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA).

Defense Mapping Agency

Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board

Federal Register

The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board reviews and evaluates the content and implementation of standards relating to the design, construction, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities of the Department of Energy (DOE). The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board was established as an independent agency on September 29, 1988, by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended (42 U. S. C. 2286-2286i). The Board is composed of five members appointed by the President with the advice and consent of the Senate. Members of the Board are appointed from among United States citizens who are respected experts in the field of nuclear safety.

Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board

Defense Special Weapons Agency

Federal Register

The Defense Special Weapons Agency (DSWA) was established by General Order No. 1 of July 1, 1971. DSWA serves as the DoD center for nuclear and advanced weapons effects expertise and performs essential missions in the areas of nuclear weapons stockpile support, nuclear effects research and operational support and nuclear threat reduction to include arms control verification technology development. The functions of DSWA were absorbed into the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) by DoD Directive 5105. 62 of September 30, 1998.

Defense Special Weapons Agency

Delaware River Basin Commission

Federal Register

The Delaware River Basin Commission was created under the terms of the Delaware River Basin Compact, Part I of Public Law 87-328 (September 27, 1961 75 Stat. 688) as a body politic and corporate, with succession for the duration of this compact, as an agency and instrumentality of the governments of the respective signatory parties (Delaware, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and New York). The Commission membership consisted of the Governors of the signatory states, ex officio, and one commissioner to be appointed by the President. The Commission’s ex officio membership consists of the Governors of the signatory states and the Division Engineer, North Atlantic Division, U. S. Army Corps of Engineers. The Commission was ordered to develop and effectuate plans, policies and projects relating to the water resources of the basin. As such it was given the authority to adopt and promote uniform and coordinated policies for water conservation, control, use and management in the basin. Other responsibilities included the encouragement, planning, development and financing of water resources projects according to such plans and policies. [https://www.state. nj. us/drbc/regs/compa. pdf]

Delaware River Basin Commission

Denali Commission

Federal Register

The Denali Commission is an independent federal agency with its office in Anchorage, Alaska. Congress created it in 1998 through the Denali Commission Act (P. L. 105-277, 42 U. S. C. 3121. The Commission was designed to provide critical utilities, infrastructure, and economic support throughout Alaska. With the creation of the Denali Commission, Congress acknowledged the need for increased inter-agency cooperation and focus on Alaska’s remote communities. Since its first meeting in April 1999, the Commission is credited with providing numerous cost-shared infrastructure projects across the State that exemplify effective and efficient partnership between federal and state agencies, and the private sector.

Denali Commission

Disability Employment Policy Office

Federal Register

The Office of Disability Employment (ODEP) is a sub-cabinet level policy agency within the Department of Labor authorized by Congress in the Department of Labor's FY 2001 appropriation. ODEP provides national leadership on disability employment policy by developing and influencing the use of evidence-based disability employment policies and practices, building collaborative partnerships, and delivering authoritative and credible data on employment of people with disabilities. With the ultimate goal of increasing the number of people with disabilities who work, either as employees or entrepreneurs, ODEP provides policy analysis, technical assistance, development of innovative practices and strategies, and education and outreach to employers, employees, and the disability community. Related to these efforts, ODEP also conducts a variety of employment-related programs and initiatives.

Disability Employment Policy Office

Drug Enforcement Administration

Federal Register

The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is the lead Federal agency in enforcing narcotics and controlled substances laws and regulations. DEA also enforces the Federal money laundering and bulk currency smuggling statutes when the funds involved in the transactions or smuggling are derived from the sale of narcotics. It was created in July 1973 by Reorganization Plan No. 2 of 1973 (5 U. S. C. app. ). DEA enforces the provisions of the controlled substances and chemical diversion and trafficking laws and regulations of the United States, and operates on a worldwide basis. It presents cases to the criminal and civil justice systems of the United States--or any other competent jurisdiction--on those significant organizations and their members involved in cultivation, production, smuggling, distribution, laundering of proceeds, or diversion of controlled substances appearing in or destined for illegal traffic in the United States. DEA disrupts and dismantles these organizations by arresting their members, confiscating their drugs, and seizing their assets; and creates, manages, and supports enforcement-related programs--domestically and internationally--aimed at reducing the availability of and demand for illicit controlled substances.

Drug Enforcement Administration

Economic Analysis Bureau

Federal Register

The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) promotes a better understanding of the U. S. economy by providing the most timely, relevant, and accurate economic accounts data in an objective and cost-effective manner. BEA's economic statistics are closely watched and provide a comprehensive picture of the U. S. economy. BEA prepares national, regional, industry, and international accounts that present essential information on such issues in the world economy. BEA's national economic statistics provide a comprehensive look at U. S. production, consumption, investment, exports and imports, and income and saving. The international transactions accounts provide information on trade in goods and services (including the balance of payments and trade), investment income, and government and private finances. In addition, the accounts measure the value of U. S. international assets and liabilities and direct investment by multinational companies. The regional accounts provide data on total and per capita personal income by region, State, metropolitan area, and county, and on gross State product. The industry economic account provides a detailed view of the interrelationships between U. S. producers and users and the contribution to production across industries.

Economic Analysis Bureau

Economic Analysis Staff

Federal Register

The Economic Analysis Staff (EAS) was established on June 15, 1982, by Secretary of Agriculture’s Memorandum 1020-6. The primary responsibility of the EAS was to advise and assist the Assistant Secretary for Economics in fulfilling his responsibility for economic policy review and analysis in the Department of Agriculture. Regulations that related to the organization and functions of EAS at 7 CFR XXXIX were removed in the Federal Register of December 31, 1996 (61 FR 68997).

Economic Analysis Staff

Economic Development Administration

Federal Register

The Economic Development Administration (EDA) was created in 1965 under the Public Works and Economic Development Act (42 U. S. C. 3121) as part of an effort to target Federal resources to economically distressed areas and to help develop local economies in the United States. It was mandated to assist rural and urban communities that were outside the mainstream economy and that lagged in economic development, industrial growth, and personal income. EDA provides grants to States, regions, and communities across the Nation to help create wealth and minimize poverty by promoting a favorable business environment to attract private capital investment and higher skill, higher wage jobs through capacity building, planning, infrastructure, research grants, and strategic initiatives. Through its grant program, EDA utilizes public sector resources to create an environment where the private sector risks capital and job opportunities are created.

Economic Development Administration

Economic Research Service

Federal Register

The mission of the Economic Research Service (ERS) is to inform and enhance public and private decisionmaking on economic and policy issues related to agriculture, food, the environment, and rural development. Activities to support this mission and the following goals involve research and development of economic and statistical indicators on a broad range of topics including, but not limited to, global agricultural market conditions, trade restrictions, agribusiness concentration, farm and retail food prices, foodborne illnesses, food labeling, nutrition, food assistance programs, worker safety, agrichemical usage, livestock waste management, conservation, sustainability, genetic diversity, technology transfer, rural infrastructure, and rural employment. Research results and economic indicators on such important agricultural, food, natural resource, and rural issues are fully disseminated to public and private decisionmakers through published and electronic reports and articles; special staff analyses, briefings, presentations, and papers; databases; and individual contacts. Through such activities, ERS provides public and private decisionmakers with economic and related social science information and analysis in support of the department's goals of enhancing economic opportunities for agricultural producers; supporting economic opportunities and quality of life in rural America; enhancing the protection and safety of U. S. agriculture and food; improving U. S. nutrition and health; and enhancing the natural resource base and environment.

Economic Research Service

Economics and Statistics Administration

Federal Register

The Economics and Statistics Administration (ESA) provides broad and targeted economic data, analyses, and forecasts for use by Government agencies, businesses, and others, as well as develops domestic and international economic policy. The Under Secretary is the chief economic adviser to the Secretary and provides leadership and executive management of the Bureau of the Census and the Bureau of Economic Analysis. ESA provides key business, economic, and international trade information products that American business and the public can use to make informed decisions through STAT. USA.

Economics and Statistics Administration

Education Department

Federal Register

The Department of Education was established by the Department of Education Organization Act (Pub. L. 96-88) of October 17, 1979. The U. S. Department of Education is the agency of the federal government that establishes policy for, administers and coordinates most federal assistance to education. It assists the president in executing his education policies for the nation and in implementing laws enacted by Congress. The Department's mission is to serve America's students—to promote student achievement and preparation for global competitiveness by fostering educational excellence and ensuring equal access.

Education Department

Election Assistance Commission

Federal Register

The U. S. Election Assistance Commission (EAC) was established by the Help America Vote Act of 2002 (HAVA). EAC is an independent, bipartisan commission charged with developing guidance to meet HAVA requirements, adopting voluntary voting system guidelines, and serving as a national clearinghouse of information about election administration. EAC also accredits testing laboratories and certifies voting systems, as well as audits the use of HAVA funds. Other responsibilities include maintaining the national mail voter registration form developed in accordance with the National Voter Registration Act of 1993.

Election Assistance Commission

Electronic Commerce Advisory Commission

Federal Register

The Advisory Commission on Electronic Commerce was a public advisory commission under the Internal Revenue Service. The Commission was established in 1999 by the internet Tax Freedom Act (Pub. L. 105-277) The general duties of the Commission were to conduct a thorough study of Federal, State and local, and international taxation and tariff treatment of transactions using the Internet and Internet access and other comparable intrastate, interstate or international sales activities. The Commission was adjourned on March 30, 2000 with the submission of its final report. [Source: https://govinfo. library. unt. edu/ecommerce/index. htm]

Electronic Commerce Advisory Commission

Employee Benefits Security Administration

Federal Register

The Employee Benefits Security Administration (EBSA) promotes and protects the pension, health, and other benefits of the over 150 million participants and beneficiaries in over 6 million private sector employee benefit plans. In administering its responsibilities, EBSA assists workers in understanding their rights and protecting their benefits; facilitates compliance by plan sponsors, plan officials, service providers, and other members of the regulated community; encourages the growth of employment-based benefits; and deters and corrects violations of the relevant statutes. The Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) is enforced through 15 EBSA field offices nationwide and the national office in Washington, DC.

Employee Benefits Security Administration

Employees Compensation Appeals Board

Federal Register

Employees' Compensation Appeals Board The Board is a three-member quasi-judicial body appointed by the Secretary which has been delegated exclusive jurisdiction by Congress to hear and make final decisions on workers' compensation appeals of Federal employees from determinations of the Office of Workers' Compensation Programs (Office) arising under the Federal Employees' Compensation Act. The Employees' Compensation Appeals Board (Board) was created by Reorganization Plan No. 2 of 1946 (60 Stat. 1095). The Board is independent of the Office, and its jurisdiction is strictly appellate and extends to questions of fact and law. The Board's decisions are not reviewable and are binding upon the Office.

Employees Compensation Appeals Board

Employment Standards Administration

Federal Register

The Employment Standards Administration (ESA), originally designated the Workplace Standards Administration, was established as a subagency within the Department of Labor, effective April 28, 1971, by Secretary's Order 13-71, May 4, 1971. The role of ESA was to administer Federal employment standards programs in areas of minimum wage and overtime, nondiscrimination and affirmative action, and workers' compensation. Supervises the activities of the Wage and Hour Division, Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs, and Office of Workers' Compensation Programs. Prior to 1978, ESA also administered, through the Women's Bureau, programs directed at improving employment conditions of working women. ESA was eliminated in 2009, leaving its four component agencies to function as independent agencies.

Employment Standards Administration

Employment and Training Administration

Federal Register

The Employment and Training Administration (ETA) was originally established as the Manpower Administration, a subagency of the Department of Labor by General Order No. 63 on August 25, 1954. Renamed Employment and Training Administration by Secretarial Order 14-75 of November12, 1975 ETA fulfills responsibilities assigned to the Secretary of Labor that relate to employment services, job training, and unemployment insurance. Component offices and services administer a Federal/State employment security system; fund and oversee programs to provide work experience and training for groups having difficulty entering or returning to the work force; formulate and promote apprenticeship standards and programs; and conduct continuing programs of research development, and evaluation.

Employment and Training Administration

Energy Department

Federal Register

The Department of Energy's mission is to foster a secure and reliable energy system that is environmentally and economically sustainable; to be a responsible steward of the Nation's nuclear weapons; to clean up the Department's facilities; to lead in the physical sciences and advance the biological, environmental, and computational sciences; and to provide premier scientific instruments for the Nation's research enterprise. The Department of Energy (DOE) was established by the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U. S. C. 7131), effective October 1, 1977, pursuant to Executive Order 12009 of September 13, 1977. The act consolidated the major Federal energy functions into one Cabinet-level Department.

Energy Department

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office

Federal Register

The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is responsible for formulating and directing programs designed to increase the production and utilization of renewable energy (solar, biomass, wind, geothermal, alcohol fuels, etc. ) and hydrogen, and improving the energy efficiency of the transportation, buildings, industrial, and utility sectors through support of research and development and technology transfer activities. It also has responsibility for administering programs that provide financial assistance for State energy planning; the weatherization of housing owned by the poor and disadvantaged; implementing State and local energy conservation programs; and the promotion of energy efficient construction and renovation of Federal facilities.

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office

Energy Information Administration

Federal Register

The U. S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) was established by the Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 (Pub. L. 95-91). EIA is the statistical and analytical agency within the U. S. Department of Energy. The Administration collects, analyzes, and disseminates independent and impartial energy information to promote sound policymaking, efficient markets, and public understanding of energy and its interaction with the economy and the environment. EIA is the Nation’s premier source of energy information and, by law, its data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. (Source: https://tonto. eia. doe.gov/abouteia/mission_overview. cfm )

Energy Information Administration

How to Get in Touch